h1

In Their Own Words – The Wisdom Of The Elites: Part 2

December 2, 2011

Go to Part 1    Go to Part 3

Part 2 – more public statements made by those in high places in Indonesia. These are an endless source of amusement, wonder, embarrassment, amazement and despair. Many of their pronouncements seem to be characterised by outright denial, shifting blame to others, justifications and outright lies. Here is a selection of gaffe-prone luminaries, their immortal words, and the context in which they were uttered. You couldn’t make this stuff up.


 Denny Indrayana, Justice and Human Rights Deputy Minister
After a former inmate blew the whistle on unseemly goings-on at a Jakarta prison, the Deputy Minister said that:

“Prostitution, gambling and human rights violations were no longer taking place in Central Jakarta’s Salemba prison.”


Panda Nababan, former Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) lawmaker
Panda was convicted of receiving bribes in the 2004 Bank Indonesia governor selection scandal and is currently incarcerated in Central Jakarta’s Salemba prison. During a meeting where prison violations, including preferential treatment for elite prisoners, was being discussed and accusations made about Panda’s “Luxurious cell”, Panda stormed in to the meeting and confronted his accuser. Red-faced, he screamed:

“Did you say you saw me in a luxurious room? You took my name to the press. Ethically, you should have asked me first, but you’re telling all of Indonesia that I have a luxury room!”

No explanation was given by prison authorities as to why Panda had access to the meeting room, which is in an area barred to inmates.


Akbar Hadi,  Spokesman for the Corrections Department
Referring to the sudden removal of Selamat Prihantara as head of Central Jakarta’s Salemba Prison, Akbar Hadi said that his transfer, which occurred after a former inmate released a video documenting a range of illegal activities, including prostitution, gambling and human rights violations, was:

“A coincidence.”


Arifinto, member of Indonesia’s Prosperous Justice Party (PKS)

Arifinto, a staunch supporter of his Party’s strict anti-pornography laws, was photographed during a Parliamentary session viewing pornography. At first claiming it was on an email that he accidentally opened, he later admitted it was his when evidence should he was opening a folder containing the material. He announced his resignation, saying:

“With all of my conscience, without any coercion from anyone or any elements, for the sake of myself and the party’s honor, following this statement, I will soon file my resignation as a member of the House of Representatives to my party.”

Interestingly, as far as anybody knows, Arifinto is still in the House and still drawing a
salary. He insisted he was staying put pending “a decree from the president.” He rationalised his refusal to depart by saying:

“Just use common logic. I am just doing [this] based on what the law states. Even if I am no longer a lawmaker, I still have the right to come to the House, right? I am also one of the people.”

“The House leaders are not my bosses, I don’t have any responsibility to report to them.”


Surahman, Head of the Prosperous Justice Party’s Sharia Board
Surprisingly, Surahman defended Arifinto with a convoluted statement that managed to imply that lawmakers are on a different plane to ‘mere mortals’, saying:

“We’re only human, not angels. What can happen to mere mortals can also happen to us.”


Jusuf Kalla, Indonesia’s  former Vice-President and Golkar Party Chief
The practice of visiting Arabs who legally ‘marry’ local women for several days, or even a few hours, was defended by Jusuf Kalla. He asserted that that this kind of marriage would help the Tourism Department attract more Arab tourists. He said:

“There is nothing wrong with Arab men staying in Indonesia, paying the local women for a very short-lived married life, and then divorcing them.”


Akbar Ramanda, accused attacker of Ahmadis in Bogor
This 17-year-old stood trial for participating in attack against an Ahmadiyah community in Bogor. He originally told police investigators that:

“I witnessed two men (his fellow attackers) inside the Ahmadiyah mosque burning books.”

By the time of the trial, his testimony had changed dramatically to:

“The men were merely using a lighter in an attempt to read the books.”


Dwi Djanuwanto, a judge at the Yogyakarta District Court
This judge was dishonourably discharged for demanding bribes including plane tickets, a hotel room, a stripper and a prostitute in return for a favourable ruling for a defendant charged with – yes, corruption. On being told of his sacking, Dwi pleaded:

“I ask that this decision not affect my standing as a civil servant, including my right to a pension.”


Ery Basworo, Head of Jakarta’s Public Works Department
After a 55-year-old woman fell into an open drain in Jakarta and died, Ery defended Jakarta’s many open drains, saying that they worked better that way. As for the danger, he helpfully suggested:

“We encourage people to step carefully.”


Agung Wirakusuma, a Kuta bar manager
After a teenager was electrocuted by an illuminated sign with faulty, exposed wiring, the bar manager blamed tourists:

“Most of night people got very drunk and he banged the sign,” he said. “Something broken inside of the sign.”


Jero Wacik, former Culture and Tourism Minister
On publication of an article in Time magazine which criticised Bali’s dirty, trash-laden beaches, Governor Pastika gracefully accepted responsibility, saying: “… clearly there has been a failure on the part of the Bali provincial government”.

In stark contrast, in Jakarta, the Culture and Tourism Minister at that time, Jero Wacik, blamed high winds, not poor governance and said litter was blown onshore from elsewhere. He said the Times article exaggerated the problems and dismissed the problem, saying:

“In the end, [the tourists] come back.”


Edhy Prabowo, Gerindra Party lawmaker
Indonesia’s Commission VIII members visiting Canberra were asked for contact details but did not know their own Commission’s email address , proferring a non-existent Yahoo email address instead. Lawmaker Edhy Prabowo leapt to their defence, saying that:

“Lawmakers were not obligated to understand technology and the Internet …”


Sahrudin, a TransJakarta Buslines officer
Transjakarta buses are now segregating men and women. As passengers were attempting to board, Sahrudin announced:

“To prevent immoral acts, male passengers please go to the back and female passengers to the front.”


Ersa Kamaruddin, Director of Bukaka Teknik Utama &
Tri Wijayanto, Director of Hutama Karya
On 26 November, the 700 metre-long Mahakam II bridge in Kalimantan collapsed suddenly and killed at least 19 people. Bukaka Teknik Utama, the engineering firm owned by former Vice President Jusuf Kalla, and responsible for the bridge’s maintenance, denied any responsibility. The director, Ersa Kamaruddin, said:

“It was completely unexpected”

He added that the firm had just been given a Rp 2.8 billion ($311,000) contract:

“to change a few bolts and tighten others.”

The company that built the bridge, state-owned contractor Hutama Karya, also ran for cover, claiming that it was only responsible for problems for the first 180 days. Its director Tri Wijayanto said that he did not know of any serious structural problems since it was built in 2001, claiming that he was unaware that the anchor blocks for the bridge’s pillars had been shifting by 18 centimetres per year. Wijayanto said:

“As far as we know, it doesn’t matter if its shifting.
As long as the bridge is still working, then it’s fine.”

“Besides, no one ever complained about the
shifting.”


From Saudi Arabian clerics
And from the country that our local fundamentalists regard as an inspirational model for Indonesia, comes this reason for prohibiting women from participating in sports:

“Running & jumping can damage a woman’s hymen and ruin her chances of getting married.”


I think it’s time for a cup of tea and a good lie down. I look at this list of gaffes and wonder why the elites in Indonesia hold themselves in such high esteem. It’s beyond me, it really is …

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: